Join The Fight for $15

$15DSAThousands of people across the country will be taking part in a huge strike for better pay and working conditions  on April 15.  From fast-food to home care, airport, construction, and Walmart workers to adjunct professors and other underpaid workers, folks from every corner of the country and the globe will be joining together across industries on Tax Day, April 15th, for the Fight for $15.

Will you stand with them this Wednesday? Find an action near you.

You and I know that it’s inevitable in the capitalist system for bosses to exploit workers. But it’s not just happening at the level of individual workplaces. Corporations must compete with each other or die, and that means avoiding expenses as much as possible. Low-wage workers struggle to make ends meet and, if they can navigate the deliberately complicated application process and the constant shaming that comes with public assistance, they get the support they need from taxpayers while their employers get off the hook for paying higher wages. That’s what I call corporate welfare.

All workers deserve a union to demand their fair share of the fruits of their labor, but in the meantime, let’s demonstrate that collective action can be society-wide, not just in one workplace. It’s good practice for building a movement for democratic socialism. Continue reading

Stand with Fast Food Workers – Dec 4

Stand with fast food, home care and airport workers fighting for $15/hr

seiuNo matter who you are or where you’re from, if you work hard, you should be able to make enough to live a good life and provide a better one for your kids. That’s the key to getting our economy and our families back on track – and it’s worth fighting for.

That’s why fast food, home care and airport workers are coming together to fight for $15 an hour and the right to stick together in a union.

Thousands of fast food workers in more than 150 cities across the country have voted to go on strike on December 4. Home care and airport workers will be on the picket lines alongside them in solidarity.

reposted from SEIU.org

McDonald’s Korea Fires Worker for Supporting Global Fast Food Protest

by Paul Garver

 MCD kOREA

Gahyun Lee was dismissed from her job at a McDonald’s outlet in Yeokgok, Gyeonggi Province on September 15 following her visit to Los Angeles earlier that month to support the national action by US fast food workers.

Management had previously warned her about union activity in May – citing a phone call from the head office – after she denounced wage and scheduling manipulation and unsafe workplace practices at a May 15 Seoul rally in support of global fast food workers. Management refused to provide her with an explanation of why her contract was terminated, instead telling her to reapply for the job. Her application was rejected.

The Arbeit Workers’ Union (which organizes precarious workers) is demanding her reinstatement and publicizing her case. You can support them by sending a message to McDonald’s Korea corporate management calling on the company to reinstate Gahyun Lee, recognize union rights and representation and enter into good faith talks with the union over unfair practices.  Go to:

http://www.iuf.org/cgi-bin/campaigns/show_campaign.cgi?c=922

McDonald’s is responsible for working conditions in franchise restaurants, labor board says

by Laura Clawson

(Photo: Wikipedia)

(Photo: Wikipedia)

In a move that could have far-reaching implications for franchised businesses and low-wage workers, the National Labor Relations Board’s general counsel said Tuesday that McDonald’s would be treated as a joint employer along with franchisees in 43 unfair labor practices cases. Setting this precedent would make it harder for the company to deny responsibility for wage theft and other abuses—like the cases that raised this question in the first place, with workers alleging they were fired in retaliation for participating in legally protected strikes. McDonald’s, like other franchise businesses, has traditionally claimed that it has nothing to do with labor practices in its restaurants, but the tight control the company exerts over every aspect of management of its franchisee-owned restaurants points to a different conclusion:

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Pair of NLRB Cases Could Land Temps, Low-Wage Workers the Protections They’ve Long Desired

by Chaz Bolte

Photo by Chris Dilts Flickr

Photo by Chris Dilts Flickr

Two cases currently before the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) will determine what it officially means to be an employer, and the ramifications for management in industries ranging from fast food to waste collection could be serious.

Given the complicated nature of modern American labor the two decisions seek to determine who employs whom and therefore who can enter into collective bargaining agreements.  The cases aim to undress the chain of command hidden by layers of temporary staffing and franchising laws many companies exploit to lower labor costs.

The first case is a consolidated case that will determine the future of fast food franchises. At question is whether McDonalds qualifies as a ‘joint employer’ along with the franchise owners.  It is one of the byproducts of a growing campaign to raise the minimum wage to $15 which has swept the nation.

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Is Fast-food Business Model Based on Wage Theft?

by Gregory N. Heires

McDonaldsThe fast-food business model is based on wage theft.

That’s the thrust of seven lawsuits that hit McDonald’s in three states last week.

Employees are cheated out of overtime.

They are forced to clock out when a computer monitoring program determines that profits are at risk because not enough customers showing up.

And the exploited workers’ pay falls below the minimum wage because they are forced to pick up the tab for cleaning their uniforms.

The lawsuits seek class-action status, which means thousands of workers could be covered. Continue reading

McDonald’s offers workers a budget solution: Get a second job

by Laura Clawson

McDonald’s and Visa have teamed up on a website that, as part of promoting Visa pay cards (yippee! fee-laden debit pay cards), offers some helpful budgeting advice. Which (oopsies!) kind of reveals how impossible it is to make a living at McDonald’s. The site provides a rather telling sample budget.
Sample monthly budget from McDonald's/Visa website showing two jobs and realistic expenses like $20 for health insurance.

McDonald’s told ThinkProgress that “The samples that are on this site are generic examples and are intended to help provide a general outline of what an individual budget may look like.” Which is, I’m sure, why the income from the first job just happens to be right around what you’d take home working close to full-time at McDonald’s wages. And also why, after ThinkProgress and others called them out on it, the budget actually changed, from showing $0 allocated for heat to showing $50 for heat.

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When There’s a Fee to Get Your Pay

by Sarah Jaffe

McDeesIn the years since the financial crisis struck in 2008, it’s often been pointed out that gains for bankers have gone hand in hand with losses for workers. But few cases provide a better example of just how direct that relationship can be than that of Natalie Gunshannon, who says her employer put her in a situation that forced her to pay fees to one of the big banks just to access her wages.

Gunshannon, of Dallas Township, Penn., filed a class action lawsuit this week against a McDonald’s franchise where she worked, claiming that she and other workers were paid not through check or direct deposit, but through a pre-paid JPMorgan Chase debit card. Along with her card, her lawsuit alleges, she received a list of fees she’d incur when she used it: $1.50 for ATM withdrawals; $5 for over-the-counter cash withdrawals; $1 per balance inquiry; 75 cents for online bill pay and $15 if she lost the card or had it stolen from her.

“I need to receive all the money I earn,” Gunshannon, who was being paid around $7.44 an hour, told a local newspaper. “I can’t afford to lose even a few dollars per paycheck. I just think people should be paid fairly and not have to pay fees to get their wages.” Continue reading

McDonald’s and 7-Eleven franchise owners push the exploitation envelope

by Laura Clawson

Photo from  Wikimedia Creative Commons

Photo from Wikimedia Creative Commons

Big corporations like McDonald’s and 7-Eleven exert a lot of control over their franchise owners when it comes to things like branding and the products they sell. When it comes to labor standards, though, it’s almost like corporate management doesn’t care at all, as two recent cases remind us. Fourteen 7-Eleven stores were seized and nine franchise owners and managers were arrested and charged with conspiring to commit wire fraud, identity theft, and harboring illegal immigrants. According to U.S. Attorney Loretta Lynch:

… the 7-Eleven defendants allegedly forced the immigrants to work 100 hours a week and pocketed the majority of their pay, while also forcing them to live in and pay rent in boarding houses that the defendants owned. This “plantation system” allegedly went on for more than 13 years, she said.

Continue reading

New York City fast food workers stage another, larger strike

by Laura Clawson

Strikers outside a New York City Burger King that was not able to open on April 4, 2013.

Strikers outside a New York City Burger King that was not able to open on April 4, 2013.

Fast food workers in New York City are following up their November action with another one-day strike, held on the anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s assassination. The November strike involved about 200 workers across the city—a record—and today’s is expected to be larger.”We’ll have double the number of strikers, four or five hundred workers on strike, and double the locations too,” Jonathan Westin, executive director of New York Communities for Change, one of the groups organizing the Fast Food Forward campaign, told Sarah Jaffe. “We will have several stores where it will not just be minority strikes like it was last time, we will have the majority of workers at several stores out on strikes, making it hard for them to do business on this day.” That prediction has held true at at least one restaurant:

This Burger King was supposed to open at 6am. All the workers are striking. It’s still closed. #fastfoodfwd http://t.co/…
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