‘Right to Work’ Weakens Democracy

by Stan Sorscher

Stan Sorscher

Stan Sorscher

We’ve heard a lot about loss of labor rights in Wisconsin, and so-called “Right to Work” legislation in Indiana, and now Michigan. We get the impression that laws in those states had somehow required workers to join unions.

Quite the contrary. Unions, are the bargaining agent for the employees, negotiating contracts with employers — binding legal contracts, sacred to conservative think tanks everywhere.

To do that, unions survey their members, prioritize their issues, and negotiate collectively to settle the terms and conditions of employment. When workers want the strength that comes from members paying dues and non-members paying an “agency fee,” their union — their bargaining agent — negotiates for that.

Continue reading

10 Things to Know About What Happened in Michigan On Thursday

by Doug Foote

Photo by @PeterKlein77 on Twitter

Photo by @PeterKlein77 on Twitter

1.) The Michigan House and Senate yesterday [Thursday=tu] passed so-called “right to work” bills. “Right to work” laws effectively defund the ability of workers to have a voice at their workplace. In 23 other states, these laws have lowered wages, weakened benefits, raised the poverty rate, and led to increased workplace injuries and deaths. The House passed one such bill and the Senate passed two.

2.) Republican leaders in Michigan were not honest about their intent. The morning began with Governor Rick Snyder reversing his earlier position on the “right to work.” He had previously said that the bill was “not on his agenda,” and that it was a divisive issue – but then yesterday, he suddenly urged the House and Senate to pass the bill and said he would sign it when it reached his desk. Similarly, Senate Majority Leader Randy Richardville previously opposed “right to work,” but expressed support for it on Thursday morning.

Continue reading

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,247 other followers